THE GENERAL DISBANDING OF THE FORCES OF

GENERAL TERRY


The Times special correspondent with Terry, telegraphs under date of Fort Buford,
at the mouth of the Yellowstone on the 8th of September via Bismarck, the 14th 1876.

The final breaking up of Terry's command occurred yesterday morning and all the troops are now
 reroute home with the exception of two regiments of infantry which will winter at the mouth of the Tongue River.

THE LONG MARCH

The Montana troops, numbering 250 infantry and 120 horses, and including the Seventh Infantry and Second Cavalry, under General Gibbon, left for Fort Ellis with a wagon train and supplies for eighty days.  They will follow the Old Stanley trail.  That route is teeming with hostiles and 420 miles long.  They may encounter a large war party in the Big Horn country.

They have been in the field since March and are poorly clad for the cold weather and fierce storms which sweep over the prairies at this season.

The twenty-second Infantry have been left at the mouth of Glendive Creek, and have commenced the construction of a stockade.  They will remain till November or later.

The Seventh Cavalry have left for Fort Buford, and will move along the North bank of the Yellowstone.  After arriving here they will go to Fort Lincoln to winter.

The Sixteenth Infantry will remain here, General Terry and staff arrived here this morning, and will remain a few days, then go to St. Paul via Bismarck.  By the 15th all the troops will be withdrawn from the Northern country except the Fifth and Twenty-Second cavalry, containing 400 men.

A COUNTERMAND

   A dispatch just received from General Sheridan countermands the order to winter a regiment of cavalry on the Yellowstone, which renders winter campaigning impossible, and indefinitely postpones the subjection of the Sioux.  Terry leaves the field, having accomplished no purpose of the exposition, and with one quarter of his troops killed by bullets or exposure.

THE SIOUX COMMISSION

Red Cloud Agency, September 15 -- today the Committee, consisting of Bishop Whipple and Dr. Daniel, appointed by the Indian Commission to go to the Spotted Tail Agency, submitted the proposition to the Indians of that agency reported here.  Spotted Tail himself favors the proposition to go to the Indian Territory.



Home

BUFORD Families in America Book 2005

Addendum to Buford Book 2005

Cemeteries

Letters
Simeon R. Buford

Letters
John Quincy Adams Buford

Obituaries

Photographs

Wills

And my ALL-TIME favorite ~ TRIVIA

~~~Clouds by Torie~~~